Monthly Archives: January 2018

Personalized Rejection Letters

I love it when an agent actually writes you a letter saying why a project didn’t work for them. It’s considerate, sometimes helpful, and more encouraging than a cookie-cutter rejection letter.

It still hurts though.

I’ve been waiting for six weeks to hear from the one agent who liked my #Pitmad tweet in December. This weekend I’ve been gearing up to actually start querying again, and then I opened my email to see her letter. She mentioned my main character by name and that she liked the tone, but the sample chapters were “too expected” and she didn’t feel compelled to read more.

I appreciated the time she took to highlight what she liked about the MS, although in some sense it hurt more when she didn’t want to give it a chance and read beyond chapter 3. Rejection is a huge part of the writing process, but it sucks. I can see why people give up sometimes or lose faith that their book will ever leave their computer. For me, I don’t want to give up writing, but it makes it hard to continue on with the same project. I think, “Maybe this other novel will be better, I should work on that one instead and forget about this one.” It’s true another MS may be stronger, but that doesn’t mean the one I’m querying now isn’t good, but why aren’t agents liking it when my critique groups have enjoyed it, but did the changes I add hurt the story, but what if I haven’t changed enough…ok I’ll stop now.

This whole process keeps me second-guessing everything I’ve put into my novel and now I’m procrastinating querying again, even though I’ve put months of revisions into the MS and re-written the query and synopsis multiple times. There is never “the perfect” time to query, and while the logic part of my brain knows that, the emotional part of my brain is afraid of getting another 50 rejection letters. The timing of this latest (although sweet) rejection letter is not helping.

If anyone has read King’s “On Writing” you will know he had a nail over his bed as a kid where he kept his rejection letters. That hanging reminder helped him move forward. I need to see past the rejections and keep going forward with this book, and then when my other MSs are ready, query them as well. Another book may be published before this one, but for now, I know this one is complete. There is no such thing as a perfect MS (we’ve all read published books we hated or with the occasional bad chapter) so why not keep going?

I’m also hoping if I say this over and over it will make it easier…not sure if it’s working yet!

Today I may not query, but my goal is to send out a couple emails this week. Today I will go through the first 15 pages and triple-check for grammar errors and probably fuss with some wording or something. I’ll review my query and synopsis again and see if I need to fuss with those too.

Keep going, don’t fall off the metaphorical horse, and seek solace in your family, friends, and critique partners.

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Filed under agent search, anxiety, Editing, query, Rejection, second guessing, Set Backs, struggling, Uncategorized, writing

Excuses, Tendonitis, and Writer’s Guilt

I should not be writing this right now.

I’m having a tendonitis flare up in my thumbs and elbows, and of course, the best course of action for this is to rest. This will likely be one of the few or only things I write for the next couple days so that I can recover and have the hand strength to write for longer stretches.

I’m a nanny to an infant, and everything that comes with taking care of him are things I should not be doing: lifting, holding, buttoning outfits, feeding him a bottle, etc. It’s physically impossible to rest an elbow! (Honestly, if you know how to rest an ELBOW tell me!) Hands I have dealt with before from clarinet-related injuries, but elbows are a whole different ball game. Of course, typing also aggravates everything too based on how I rest my arms and the small, repetitive motions.

The irony: I want to write.

When I felt fine and was able to type, I procrastinated, as we all do. The internet is a hotbed of distractions, so my writing would come in short, productive bursts. I’ve come to terms that I’m not the kind of person who can sit and write for hours at a time. If inspired, sure, I can have a good 45-60 minutes of solid writing. In general, those writing bursts are shorter, even on the rare days when the baby actually naps longer than half and hour.

Of course, now that typing is the forbidden fruit, I want it. So badly. I want to open up my WIP and go to town on them! Instead, I’m wrapping my elbow in an electric heating pad, taking 5 minutes to write this post, and resting until the baby wakes up. The writer’s guilt is so real right now. I want to give my projects the attention they deserve, and although I have a real reason to take a break, I still feel irritated and sad that I can’t do anything. I have to stay healthy enough to do my job, and I also want to be on top of this before I can’t do things. I’m luckily at a point of discomfort and not at the point where it’s severe. (The goal is to avoid weeks of occupational therapy!)

So to those of you with healthy joints this week: enjoy them. Lift things to your heart’s content, write, and scroll through Facebook for hours. Be careful and be aware of your posture and how much time you use your thumbs though (#smartphone), because this can sneak up on you.

Those of you with soreness these days: I feel you. Take breaks, try not to feel guilty about not writing. I understand that frustration since this is not the first time I’ve had to take a break from writing or practicing music I love. Find creative ways to remember your ideas and mull over some projects that maybe have had a little too much TLC recently.

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Filed under pain, Set Backs, tendonitis, Uncategorized, writer's guilt, writing

Keep Those Midnight Ideas

Yesterday I was hanging out in a cafe, waiting for my car to finish at the mechanic, when I found myself bored with my current projects. Well, not bored so much as not willing/able to work on them. I finished draft #3 of the YA book which is now being read, another is with a critique partner, and the other 2 are “marinating” for a while. As much as I’ve gotten the editing bug (as I wrote about earlier this week) there wasn’t inspiration. Somehow I managed to not give into temptation and scroll through Facebook. Instead, I went through two folders on my desktop: Started Novels, and Ideas.

Have you ever had that idea that sounds amazing either just before you fall asleep or just before you wake up?I keep pen and paper/post-its on my headboard for just these occasions. Sometimes these ideas/dreams are the most revolutionary thoughts ever to come into existence…that is, until you’ve had coffee in the morning and actually read what you wrote.

I’m telling you right now: Keep them.

Those weird, incoherent thoughts that popped into your mind, write it down, start a Word/Google/Scrivener document and jot down more random thoughts. Save it in a folder for a rainy day and come back to it when looking for inspiration. A year after the fact, it may not be as stupid as you once thought.

I often find myself mulling over ideas for weeks before starting a project. If I’m smart, I write my initial thoughts down and then let my brain ruminate on them for a while. My YA book has been in the back of my mind since high school. I was thinking of a short story idea at the time, then when I came back to it, I realized it had the potential for a novel-length work.

Anyway, yesterday I went through my ideas folder and found some cool stuff. One was a project I totally forgot about, even though I wrote about 15 pages. I have no clue where I was going with it, and my Plot Points doc I had apparently decided to stop working. However, another project (one I actually remember starting) turned out to be a little better than I remembered. I saw a movie the other day and my mind went back to this little nothing of a book beginning and I got to thinking. My original plan when I started this book about a year ago was kind of unoriginal and cute. I went through the 3 chapters I wrote and have decided to take it in a different direction and see what happens. I may get stuck after another 3 chapters and let it sit for a year. Awesome, who cares. I’m writing, creating, thinking, and practicing my craft. Don’t give up on your half-awake brain too soon! You never know where you’ll find inspiration in a period of writer’s block.

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Filed under Editing, fantasy writing, ideas, inspiration, Uncategorized, writing

The Ideal Word Count

I’m going to be totally honest: My published novel is way too long for it’s genre. Word count may be subjective, but when you’re a new writer it’s a good idea to stay within the suggested guidelines. At the time, I didn’t have the heart to cut it down to the “ideal” word count for a middle grade fantasy. I still believe The Healing Pool is a good story, although if I hadn’t published yet I would totally be slashing away to trim it down.

Since The Healing Pool was published I’ve gotten much more concise with my writing. I’ve gotten better (with the help of critique partners) finding areas that drag and cutting them to get to the good parts. For middle grade (MG) that’s especially important. Young readers want action, drama, interest and not too much backstory. As much as I love backstory, I always end up cutting at least 80% of it from the initial draft for that age group. My latest MG novels are at a comfortable length of 35-40K words. Just in the sweet spot for the genre.

However, my new found joy in trimming the fat has come to bite me in the rear with my young adult (YA) novel. The first draft halted at a mere 48K words, just too short to compete with other YA books. For the first time in a while, I’m finding it hard to get more into the backstory or really hash out some arguments between characters, even when I have the luxury to expand, explain, and elaborate to my heart’s content. I’ve gotten used to writing fast-paced action, but with this book I should take more time. I need more practice hashing out relationships between characters. I’ve taken the time to do that over the past few months, and it’s been a painful process of adding sentences here, extra dialog there, with only the occasional burst of adding or doubling a chapter.

With several novels at various stages of completion, I should be glad I’ve gotten the editing bug. I enjoy working on a completed piece. It’s challenging yes, but sometimes it’s a relief to have a complete plot and just work on the details! I’m just at the end of the third draft of my YA novel and somehow managed to add about 10K words from the original. It’s satisfying to watch my novel creep up from still MG length to a just-acceptable length for a YA book. I’m hoping the changes are positive ones that stick and can continue to grow. My biggest fear is that when I come back to it after a break/critique group, all those lovely words will be eaten by the delete key…

Anyone else watch their word count like a non-boiling pot? Anyone have trouble cutting even one word from a first draft?

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Filed under Editing, Uncategorized, word count, writing